Tuesday, February 26, 2019

small scale business

small scale business


Setting up for business growth and expansion - Chase News & Stories

Posted: 26 Feb 2019 03:06 AM PST

Maybe you started out small with, say, one storefront or a single service. But you're doing well—really well—and just may think it's time to scale up.

Choose what's right for your business

Growing your business is exciting, but you can also run into many potentially daunting (or, okay, downright terrifying) decisions on the horizon that come with building a new location, varying your offerings or whatever expansion means to you. Without the right strategy and knowledge, you could miss your best opportunity to expand, or bet on a less fruitful path.

Whether you're looking for capital, partnership, opportunity or a new strategy to take your business into the next, bigger phase, start by reading these essential pieces.

Tap credit to grow and thrive

As a small business owner, you're likely familiar with financing. But there's always more to learn. Whatever your knowledge level, it's clear that the more you can understand about seeking business credit, the better positioned you'll be to finance your dreams.

Ready to take your business global?

For some business owners, expansion means going international. Understand what you need to know about taking your company abroad.

Find the right relationships to help your small business thrive

Building a strong network can open you up to opportunities you might not even know about yet. Savvy entrepreneurs take advantage of their expertise, personal identities and other unique characteristics to make new connections.

Spring clean your business to promote growth

Just like a home, clutter can build up in a business, both within your physical space and also your processes. These six steps will help you clean up shop.

Mid-stage business financing: get to the next level

Part of scaling a business often means finding a way to secure more money. Investment capital is one option to get your company the cash infusion it needs.

Chase logo | Learn more about Chase Ink® business credit cards with rewards designed for your small business.

Regulating Facebook could hinder small businesses with overseas customers - The Conversation AU

Posted: 26 Feb 2019 11:11 AM PST

Digital platforms provide a host of challenges for governments. Questions about how to best protect privacy, democracy, and speech online become more pressing every year.

But policies that affect online platforms also affect international trade. Many Australian small businesses rely on digital platforms to stay on par with their international competitors.

As Australia starts tackling the challenges wrought by digital platforms, policymakers should be careful not to undo the good things that stem from an evermore connected world. That includes the critical role of these platforms in helping retailers sell their products to overseas customers.


Read more: The law is closing in on Facebook and the 'digital gangsters'


Platforms facilitate exports

As my new research with colleague Danielle Parks shows, digital platforms appear to significantly reduce the economic distance and trade costs between buyers and sellers.

Take Facebook, for example. Facebook is both a social networking platform and digital market platform, where Facebook's Marketplace helps business owners connect with potential customers.

The social networking interface allows buyers and sellers to message each other and exchange information about what the seller has, and what the buyer wants. Meanwhile, Marketplace features like identity verification and buyer ratings help to facilitate connections more quickly, and with more trust, than might otherwise be possible.

There isn't a lot of large-scale data on cross-border e-commerce, so researchers must get creative to study digital platforms and trade. The findings are extraordinary.

One study found that 97% of US-based eBay sellers export product to overseas buyers. Another found the "economic effect of distance" to be 65% smaller on eBay. In other words, the digital platform reduces the challenges of selling to people in other countries.


Read more: Innovative e-commerce approaches can help small businesses in Africa


Research conducted by PayPal showed that 79% of US small businesses on its platform sell to foreign markets. And PayPal merchants that exported, outperformed businesses in general. Interestingly, that finding held for coastal and non-coastal businesses, and for rural and urban businesses alike.

In our new study, we surveyed Australian businesses on Facebook. We found that those with a Facebook presence were 63% more likely to export their products internationally than other businesses. The propensity to export was higher across all business sectors and nearly all company sizes.

This emerging pattern shows how world markets are opening up to smaller businesses that might not otherwise be able to compete with their larger, multinational rivals. These findings can partly be attributed to export-prone firms being more likely than others to use digital platforms. But there is no question that the platforms can also enable trade.

Most governments recognise the need to dismantle barriers to foreign market access, and any new policies regarding digital platforms should not make it harder for small and medium sized businesses to engage in trade.

How regulation could hurt small businesses

The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is currently conducting an inquiry into digital platforms at the request of the treasurer.

The ACCC's preliminary report recognises how digital platforms have revolutionised the ways consumers and businesses communicate with one another. The report also highlights concerns over data privacy and the influence of bad actors producing and spreading misinformation.

The final report, expected in June, will make policy recommendations that aim to address these concerns. But these policies could also inadvertently threaten the revenue streams of businesses that advertise on these platforms or that use them to facilitate online sales.

Restrictions on the cross border flow of consumer information could interfere with everyday business practices. For example, a key advantage of e-commerce, especially for small businesses, is using search engine techniques to reach larger audiences, and target potential customers. So, search engine restrictions could limit the way businesses target customers with advertising, therefore limiting a business owner's ability to reach customers abroad.

Other regulations could restrict business owners from storing the personal information of customers – such as credit card information, consumer preferences and purchase history. That would then limit businesses in how they interact with customers at home and abroad.


Read more: Taking on big tech: where does Australia stand?


What's happening at the moment

Australia is not alone in considering these tough issues. The landscape of digital data flows, data privacy, and e-commerce is a work in progress for governments across the globe.

The EU recently enacted data privacy regulation called the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which is designed to:

[…] fundamentally reshape the way in which data is handled across every sector, from health care to banking and beyond.

Meanwhile, the United States Congress will likely consider new internet privacy legislation this year.

Provisions on digital data flows have been included in major recent international trade agreements. Both the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) and the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) bar data localisation requirements. That means foreign companies would only be allowed to work in a country if they built out or leased separate data infrastructures in that country – a costly endeavour, especially for smaller businesses.

On the other hand, USMCA and TPP do not allow participating countries to require that platforms disclose their source code or algorithms. These provisions do not necessarily preclude countries from adopting privacy protections, but they do make it easier for platforms like Facebook to operate without fear that they will be asked to handover important intellectual property.

As the government considers the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission report, one thing should be clear: any policy changes should not overlook the role of these platforms in helping Australian small businesses sell goods to customers in the global marketplace.

Avoid common legal mistakes small businesses make - Chase News & Stories

Posted: 26 Feb 2019 03:06 AM PST

From the moment you have the spark of an idea for your business, you'll need to make decisions with legal implications. Then, as you ride a wave of adrenaline and excitement to launch your venture, you're once again faced with the possibility to make legal mistakes.

Choose what's right for your business

Seem far fetched?

For instance, the business name idea you've been playing with could have copyright considerations. And declaring your business entity requires a close eye on legal paperwork.

You'll continue to make legal decisions as you grow and scale, too. Yes, you'll likely have a great small business lawyer helping you get in the weeds. But part of keeping your business running is having a broad understanding of legal decisions that can make a big difference down the line. Here's what to know.

Our most expensive mistakes: by theSkimm founders

Not hiring the right legal team can be a costly mistake. The founders of popular newsletter theSkimm share the lessons they've learned (so you can avoid making the same mistakes).

Choosing the best business name: it's not so easy anymore

Picking a name for your company sounds like a very straightforward process, but it's full of nuance. Understand what's in a name—that's fit for your business, that is.

Sole proprietor? LLC? How businesses are set up

Your business entity will influence many of your financial decisions, so choosing the right structure is crucial. Know the options and what's available to you.

JPMorgan Chase and its affiliates do not give legal advice. Please consult your own legal advisor before engaging in any transaction.

Chase logo | Learn more about Chase Ink® business credit cards with rewards designed for your small business.

South Africa Prepaid Cards Business and Investment Opportunities 2014-2019 & 2023 - Consumer Attitude & Behaviour, Retail Spend, Market Risk - GlobeNewswire

Posted: 26 Feb 2019 02:45 AM PST

Dublin, Feb. 26, 2019 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "South Africa Prepaid Cards Business and Investment Opportunities - Market Size and Forecast (2014-2023), Consumer Attitude & Behaviour, Retail Spend, Market Risk" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.Market dynamics: Provides a comprehensive view on size and structure, industry dynamics, market trends, consumer attitude and behaviour, and competitive landscape in prepaid card industry in South Africa.Open loop and closed loop: market estimates and forecasts to assess opportunities in open loop and closed loop prepaid market segments. Details four essential KPIs - number of cards in circulation, number of transactions, load value, and value of transactions.Open loop prepaid card categories: Identifies potential risks, consumer adoption, and market size across 11 market segments in open loop prepaid cards for the period 2014-2023. These include gift, business & administrative expense, payroll, meal, employee / partner incentive, travel forex, general purpose, remittance, teen and campus, social security and other government benefit programs, insurance claims.Closed loop prepaid card categories: Identifies potential risks, consumer adoption, and market size across 10 market segments in closed loop prepaid cards for the period 2014-2023. These include gift, healthcare and wellness, consumer incentives, employee / partner incentives, entertainment and gaming, teen and campus, social security and other government benefit programs, transit and tolls, and fuel, utilities, and others.Benchmarking and risk index: Benchmarks the prepaid card industry in the country with key global markets along with risk assessment through the Prepaid Cards Industry Risk Index (PCIRI).Consumer attitude and behaviour: Drawing from proprietary survey results, this report identifies and interprets key prepaid KPIs, including spend by age, gender, and income level. In addition, it provides an overview of how consumers are currently using prepaid cards across five key categories - travel, bill payment, retail spend, cash withdrawal, and P2P transfers. It also provides a breakdown by transaction size.Retail spend: Breaks down retail spend across 11 categories to provide detailed insights on consumer behaviour and changing dynamics of prepaid card spend.Included in the ReportSouth Africa Gift card spend analysis: Market size and forecast by functional attribute (open loop and closed loop) and by consumer segments (retail, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business). Also, breaks down the market size by consumer behavior, covering gifting occasion, card type (paper, plastic, digital), and market share by retail categories.South Africa Business & administrative expense card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level and by consumer segments (government, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business).South Africa Payroll card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level and by consumer segments (government, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business).South Africa Meal card spend analysis: Market size and forecast by consumer segments (government, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business).South Africa Healthcare and wellness card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level.South Africa Consumer incentive card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level and by consumer segments (government, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business).South Africa Employee / partner incentive card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level and by functional attribute (open loop and closed loop) and by consumer segments (government, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business).South Africa Travel forex card spend analysis: Market size and forecast by consumer segments (retail, government, small scale business, mid-size business, and enterprise business).South Africa General purpose card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level and by consumer segments (banked and underbanked / unbanked).South Africa Remittance card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level.South Africa Teen and campus card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level and by functional attribute (open loop and closed loop).South Africa Social security and other government benefit program cards spend analysis: Market size and forecast by functional attribute (open loop and closed loop).South Africa Insurance claim card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level.South Africa Entertainment and gaming card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level.South Africa Transit and toll card spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level.South Africa Fuel, utilities, and other cards spend analysis: Market size and forecast at category level.Reason to BuyIn-depth understanding of prepaid card market dynamics: Understand market opportunity, industry dynamics, key trends and drivers across 75+ market segments and sub-segments of prepaid cards in South Africa.Develop market specific strategies: Identify growth segments and target specific opportunities to formulate your prepaid cards strategy; assess market specific key trends, drivers and risks in prepaid cards industry.Get insights into consumer attitude and behaviour: Understand changing consumer attitude and behaviour and boost ROI. Get detailed insights into retail spend through prepaid cards.Establish market attractiveness: Gain insights into market attractiveness relative to other global markets through the Prepaid Cards Industry Attractiveness and Risk Index.Companies Mentioned
FirstRand Bank LtdNedbank Group LtdStandard Bank of South AfricaAbsa Group LtdGauteng Provincial GovernmentWoolworths Holdings Ltd (South Africa)Edcon Holdings LtdFoschini Group LtdPick 'n' Pay Stores LtdShoprite Holdings LtdMusica LtdMasterCardVisa IncFirstRand Bank LtdNedbank Group LtdStandard Bank of South AfricaAbsa Group LtdMasterCardVisa IncAbsa Group LtdStandard Bank of South AfricaGauteng Provincial GovernmentWoolworths Holdings Ltd (South Africa)Edcon Holdings LtdFoschini Group LtdPick 'n' Pay Stores LtdShoprite Holdings LtdMusica LtdFor more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/bsnf8b/south_africa?w=12Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research.CONTACT: ResearchAndMarkets.com Laura Wood, Senior Press Manager press@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900 Related Topics: Bank Cards

OneH2 Acquires Nuvera Powertap Hydrogen Generator Business - PRNewswire

Posted: 26 Feb 2019 10:31 AM PST

OneH2, a North Carolina based hydrogen fuel company, has developed a highly scalable solution for hydrogen fuel production and distribution. Through their innovative, delivered hydrogen fuel model, OneH2 provides low-cost installation and rapid deployment of refueling infrastructure to support widespread uptake of hydrogen powered trucks and vehicles. The Nuvera acquisition further strengthens the OneH2 business model by adding agile small-scale hydrogen production technology.

Prior to OneH2, existing hydrogen powered truck sales were generally limited to users who could afford a large capital investment associated with the traditional means of storing and preparing un-compressed hydrogen for on-site refueling.  In 2017, through distributors such as OneH2 Southeast, OneH2 introduced a strategy of offering hydrogen powered truck users possessing small to medium-sized fleets the ability to have access to ready to use compressed hydrogen fuel without the need for a large capital investment.

Paul Dawson, President & CEO of OneH2, commented, "I was already very excited about the speed at which our company was growing, and I am confident that this acquisition will engender even swifter growth. The demand for a cleaner, more efficient energy source has surfaced in both the industrial and on-road truck market, and OneH2 is positioning itself to play a leadership role in fulfilling that growing demand."

ABOUT ONEH2, INC.

OneH2, Inc., headquartered in Longview, North Carolina, is a privately held, vertically integrated hydrogen fuel company.  OneH2 is emerging as a leader in providing scalable hydrogen fuel systems coupled with cost effective delivered hydrogen fuel for use in industrial vehicle and truck markets.  For more information about OneH2, Inc. visit the Company's website at www.oneh2.com

If you would like more information about this topic, please call Andrew McCoy at (844) 996-6342, ext. 710 or email andrew.mccoy@oneh2.com.

SOURCE OneH2, Inc.

Related Links

http://oneh2.com

No comments:

Post a Comment