Monday, February 25, 2019

small business grants

small business grants


Status Update: FedEx small business contest opens with $220,500 in grants - OCRegister

Posted: 25 Feb 2019 08:00 AM PST

  • Joe Baksha, president and CEO of Irvine-based OSI Creative, is retiring March 1. He will be succeeded by John Kellogg, the company's chief operating officer.

  • John Kellogg will succeed Joe Baksha, president and CEO of Irvine-based OSI Creative, March 1.  Kellogg has been the company's chief operating officer since October 2018. The company supplies its clients with point-of-purchase displays, custom packaging options and branded merchandise programs.

  • Mary Zimmer, a healthcare executive and former speech-language pathologist, has joined CHOC Children's leadership team as vice president of operations. Previously Zimmer was chief patient and clinical services officer of Citrus Valley Health Partners in the East San Gabriel Valley.

  • Meg Linton is the new chief executive officer at the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation. She will steer the nonprofit in its efforts to fund library resources, programs and services. Previously Linton was the executive director of the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara.

  • Lewis Liu, an automotive strategist for several international and Chinese brands, has joined Irvine-based Karma Automotive as vice president of business development and strategy. His role will help lead long-term business strategies focused on luxury, high technology, customization and customer treatment. Liu comes to Karma from Faraday Future where he served as senior director of strategic and business development since 2016.

  • Summer Taylor joins the board of directors at Santa Ana-based Think Together, a nonprofit organization that partners with schools to change the odds for kids. Taylor is a managing director at Deloitte.

  • Visit Anaheim Cares is donating $20,000 to GOALS, an Anaheim-based nonprofit designed to help improve the lives of local underserved children. Names in the group photo in order from left to right: Council Member Brandman; Anaheim Mayor Harry Sidhu; Dave Wilk, executive director G.O.A.L.S.; Bill O'Connell, Visit Anaheim Cares chairman; Cathy Dutton, Visit Anaheim Cares board member; Greg Gerovac, Visit Anaheim Cares board member. (Courtesy of Visit Anaheim)

  • Hoag Medical Group will open its newest state-of-the-art pediatrics office to the public from 9-11 a.m. Saturday, March 2 at 500 Superior Avenue, Suite 270, Newport Beach. The open house will feature meet-and-greets with pediatricians and plus activities for the family (face painting, balloon creations, tours, refreshments and more).

FedEx has launched its seventh annual Small Business Grant Contest, offering grants and services to 10 U.S.-based small businesses.

The collective prize pool is $220,500, the largest sum since the contest was established in 2012.

Grants, winners also will receive money money in credits to use toward FedEx Office print and business services to help run their businesses. Prizes include packages designed to help them with website optimization, design thinking, social media, and print expertise.

Here's how the prizes break down: Grand prize: One winner of $50,000, plus $7,500 in print and business services. Silver prize: One winner of $30,000, plus $5,000 in print and business services. Bronze prize: Eight winners of $15,000, plus $1,000 in FedEx print and business services.

The contest is open to U.S.-based for-profit small businesses that have fewer than 99 employees and have been operating for six months or more.

To enter, go to fedex.com/grantcontest and enter contact information, write a short profile about your business and upload four photos of the business or product, including a logo. Participants also have the option of submitting a 90-second "elevator speech" video to supplement their entry.

The contest entry period closes March 25 with voting to take place from Feb. 27 to April 1. Following a judging period, winners will be announced April 29 at fedex.com/grantcontest.

Executive shuffle at OSI

Joe Baksha, president and CEO of Irvine-based OSI Creative, is retiring March 1. He will be succeeded by John Kellogg, the company's chief operating officer.

The company supplies its clients with point-of-purchase displays, custom packaging options and branded merchandise programs. Baksha exits the firm with 50 years of industry experience.

Kellogg joined OSI in October 2018. He brings to OSI 28 years of experience in the printing, packaging, distribution and display industries.

Also in OSI news, the company has completed bought the assets of New Dimensions Research Corp., a Long Island, New York-based designer and manufacturer of displays and merchandising. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

NDR employees joining OSI will continue working from NDR's existing facility in Melville, New York.

On the move

Mary Zimmer, a healthcare executive and former speech-language pathologist, has joined CHOC Children's leadership team as vice president of operations. She will oversee laboratories, radiology and imaging services, pharmacy, clinical nutrition and lactation, rehabilitation services, neurodiagnostics, food services, environmental services, safety and security, biomedical services administration, and facilities and plant operations at CHOC's main hospital campus in Orange. Previously Zimmer was chief patient and clinical services officer of Citrus Valley Health Partners in the East San Gabriel Valley.

Meg Linton is the new chief executive officer at the Newport Beach Public Library Foundation. She will steer the nonprofit in its efforts to fund library resources, programs and services. Previously Linton was the executive director of the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, director of galleries and exhibitions for the Ben Maltz Gallery at the Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, and executive director of the Center for Contemporary Arts in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Lewis Liu, an automotive strategist for several international and Chinese brands, has joined Irvine-based Karma Automotive as vice president of business development and strategy. His role will help lead long-term business strategies focused on luxury, high technology, customization and customer treatment. Liu comes to Karma from Faraday Future where he served as senior director of strategic and business development since 2016.

On board

Summer Taylor joins the board of directors at Santa Ana-based Think Together, a nonprofit organization that partners with schools to change the odds for kids. Taylor is a managing director at Deloitte.

Grants

Visit Anaheim Cares is donating $20,000 to GOALS, an Anaheim-based nonprofit designed to help improve the lives of local underserved children. This donation will support GOALS' mission to provide after-school athletics, academics, community service, mentoring and job training.

The California Governor's Office of Emergency Services has awarded Waymakers a $1.1 million grant to support the nonprofit's statewide campaign to prevent violence within families in California. The two-year grant is directed to Waymakers' Project PATH (Positive Action Toward Health) program. For more Waymakers and their programs and shelters throughout Orange County, go to waymakersoc.org.

Coming up

Arts Orange County will present Vijay Gupta as featured speaker for its 10th annual Creative Edge Lecture at 10 a.m. Tuesday, March 5 at the Irvine Barclay Theatre. The lecture is free to the public. Gupta, a violinist and social justice advocate, is the founder and Artistic Director of Street Symphony, a non-profit organization providing musical engagement, dialogue and teaching artistry for homeless and incarcerated communities in Los Angeles. Guests should register directly through the Barclay Theatre online at thebarclay.org or artsoc.org by calling 949-854-4646, Ext. 1.

Hoag Medical Group will open its newest state-of-the-art pediatrics office to the public from 9-11 a.m. Saturday, March 2 at 500 Superior Avenue, Suite 270, Newport Beach. The open house will feature meet-and-greets with pediatricians and plus activities for the family (face painting, balloon creations, tours, refreshments and more).

Correction

A photo accompanying an item on Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian in last week's Status Update column was the incorrect hospital. The photo was chosen in haste by the business editor; she was duly chastised by loyal readers of this column. Everyone needs an editor, right?

Status Update is compiled by contributing writer Karen Levin and edited by Business Editor Samantha Gowen. Submit items to sgowen@scng.com. High-resolution images also can be submitted. Allow at least one week for publication. Items are edited for length and clarity.

RCAD businesses to receive grants from $100K gift - Rockport Pilot

Posted: 24 Feb 2019 11:48 PM PST

The Rockport Cultural Arts District (RCAD) announced at a special ceremony Thursday, Feb. 21, in the heart of downtown Rockport, it received a $100,000 grant from Ed and Sasha Bass to support RCAD small businesses and to promote the RCAD.

"We are excited to hear this announcement," said Aransas County Judge C.H. "Burt" Mills.

Rockport Mayor Pat Rios said, "This is an exciting time for the city and the district. I'm looking forward to the changes this (grant money) will bring."

Rockport-Fulton Chamber of Commerce President/CEO Diane Probst noted, "This is an important day. The downtown area is a big part of our recovery."

The money will fund individual grants ranging from $1,000 to $7,000 to enhance RCAD business and to sustain their financial viability.

Any small business located within the RCAD that is open will be able to apply for a grant using the online application at rockportculturalartsdistrict.com.

Applications must be made by midnight March 6.

Grants will be distributed March 20 to the approximately 20 to 30 businesses that complete the online grant application by the deadline date, and are selected as having presented the most effective cases for using the grant funds and/or for demonstrating need for the funds.

RCAD Executive Director Hannah Miller said businesses chosen will be selected using a "blind review process," which means the selection committee will have no way of knowing which business is being selected.

"We are so thankful (to Ed and Sasha)," said RCAD Board President Jennifer Day. "We see this (announcement) as a success and a milestone (in our recovery).

"This is a very generous and much needed donation.

"It is both a privilege and a responsibility to have a Cultural District designation."

Probst talked about how quickly the donation came about.

"Mayor Rios walked into my office a few weeks ago and asked, 'So, the small business grant program is working well?'"

She told the mayor 150 businesses had received $450,000 in the past 16 months through three rounds of grants.

"He said, 'I think we have a donor who would like to help with that program. They want to concentrate their efforts in one area near their property.'" said Probst.

Bass family representative Pete Geren then met with local officials at the Daily Grind for lunch discuss funding possibilities.

The coffee shop's owner Michell McMahon happened to be there and shared what the downtown Rockport area had been through.

"Now, a few weeks later, we are so excited to accept this wonderful gift," said Probst

A statement from Ed and Sasha Bass, provided by Geren, was read at Thursday's announcement.

"They want you to know how much they appreciate everything each of you have done to get through these last 17 months after Hurricane Harvey," said Geren. "It is their hope these next months will be a little easier with a little help from those who care about you. Good luck to a great spring and summer season."

McMahon made final comments at the celebration, saying, "It's been a tough 17 months, but since the 1800s this has been the merchants' area and we want this to continue."

Rockport-Fulton Cheerleaders then led the crowd in a special rendition of the cheer "Two Bits."

•••

The RCAD is following the lead of the Small Business Grant program offered by the chamber in 2018 following Hurricane Harvey.

The RCAD received its designation as a Texas Cultural District by the Texas Commission on the Arts in the fall of 2016. It serves as an economic development asset, to preserve and build the cultural, culinary and visual arts, which attract visitors and entrepreneurs to Rockport. For more information about the district or the grant, visit rockportculturalartsdistrict.com.

How To Fund Your Start-Up Business Idea - Forbes

Posted: 25 Feb 2019 01:54 AM PST

Loan counselor working on tablet pc, ensuring loan applications are correctGetty

You've got the idea, the drive, the know-how: how about the capital? Funding is an essential part of any business, as without the seed money you'll be unable to fire the starting gun on your, er, start-up.

Entrepreneurs are an incredibly clever and industrious bunch, but many are in the dark about how best to fund their start-up business, preferring instead to focus their energies on a core offering. One supposes that reviewing funding options can seem like a dull, laborious task when you are devoting time and attention to your genius idea. In any case, great ideas can only fulfil their potential if they are backed by stable investment.

Read on to find out the best ways of obtaining financial backing for your start-up business idea.

1. Pursue a grant

The less monied cousin of a bank loan is a grant. While you shouldn't expect to be cut a massive check, there are dozens of grants available, offered by national and state governments (as well as private enterprises) in the interests of stimulating the economy and growing the jobs market so it's worth checking out your options for funding your startup.

These financial injections can help you save money on premises and fixed rates, purchase cheaper IT or manufacturing equipment and fund staff training. The main drawback, of course, is the fierce competitiveness of such grants, as well as the box-ticking involved: it can be a frustratingly drawn-out process, but that's the tradeoff for retaining equity. In the US, start-up grants are offered by organizations such as Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR), the National Association for the Self-Employed (NASE) and Idea Cafe.

2. Crowdfund

Person's Hand Protecting Stacked Banknotes Surrounded By Human FiguresGetty

Crowdfunding is a favorite of the digital economy, and probably the quickest way of obtaining finance for a new business. You don't even have to be massively tech-savvy to launch a crowdfunding campaign, but what you do need is a compelling pitch, one which strongly references your start-up's potential for growth, as well as a knack for interacting with your cash-rich community. If all goes to plan, you'll have capital you don't need to pay back, without ceding any operational control. As a side benefit, crowdfunding is a nifty form of advertising, a way of stimulating public interest in your company before it's even made its debut. The difficulty, needless to say, is in getting your voice heard in the vast crowdfunding landscape.

3. Family and friends

The idea of hitting friends and family for cash doesn't sit well with some entrepreneurs, but many of the world's top magnates readily admit to borrowing from their social network early in their careers. As such, you should have no compunction about doing the same. Soliciting short- or long-term loans from friends and family might lead to some domestic squabbles down the road, but you won't usually have to pay them back with interest added. Indeed, you might not have to pay loans back at all, depending on the generosity of your creditor. On the other hand, it's not easy to put together a hefty bankroll relying solely on family and friends; and you have to ask yourself whether you really want to risk straining meaningful relationships.

4. Get an angel investor on board

Don't pray to the angels; seek angel investors. Targeting high net-worth individuals who have a track record of supporting start-ups isn't difficult to do, but the challenge lies in convincing them you're worthy of their investment. There are many online angel investment networks, as well as local investor groups you can pitch to in person, so do your research and start submitting your pitches. Find the right angel investor and not only will you benefit from their financial support but also their wisdom: oftentimes, they offer mentorship as a side dish alongside their capital. On the other hand, they generally offer less financial backing than banks and venture capital funds.

5. Raise money yourself

Entrepreneurs are a hardy, headstrong bunch and many elect to fund their business all by themselves. Breezing past the bank, they sell their possessions, save money from their day job, invest in various endeavors and free up capital by remortgaging (OK, that one does require a hasty U-turn to the bank). By going it alone, you'll retain complete control and be unburdened of the interest and strain of other avenues. And this decision has a precedent: over 90% of start-ups get up and running without the aid of loans or grants. On the other hand, raising money can become a full-time job in its own right – taking your attention from your business. To bootstrap or not to bootstrap: that is the question.

6. Seek venture capital

Finding a venture capitalist who shares your vision, or at the very least believes in your ability to turn your idea into a successful, profitable venture, is a good way of raising cash. Of course, you will need a fine-tuned business model, ideally one that's ready to scale. The main con with this option is that venture capitalists are typically looking for the next big thing, and so many entrepreneurs struggle to convey the scale-ability of their enterprise. Venture capital funds, by their very nature, have a short shelf life as they generally seek to recover their investment, turn a profit then move on to the next fresh start-up.

7. Good ol' bank loan or line-of-credit

closeup of a young businessman using a tablet on a table full of chartsGetty

In the modern age, it almost seems anachronistic to seek a bank loan. But if you've a solid credit history or existing assets which you're happy to offer as collateral, as well as a workable business plan with clear profit forecasts, it's still possible to launch your start-up with an infusion of bank cash. The advantages of this option are that you retain full equity, you can feasibly obtain a large figure and that you can build your credit; the negatives are that you'll need to pay back everything, plus interest, or leave yourself vulnerable to bankruptcy.

8. Ditch the bank in favor of micro-finance

Small-scale entrepreneurs can access capital via microfinance, circumnavigating the bank entirely. This is an especially good option for people with a bad credit score or track record, as micro-finance institutions like Non-Banking Financial Corporations (NBFCs) are more willing to green-light loans to individuals normally deemed high-risk. In essence, such organizations exist to promote financial inclusion and cater for those at the bottom of the financial pyramid. Pros: no need for assets, low interest rates. Cons: modest loans, various documentation (references, financial statements, business plan etc.) required.

Conclusion

Needless to say, all of the aforementioned options require a good deal of consideration. What might be right for one budding tycoon may not be right for another. For example, you may have an excellent bank manager whom you implicitly trust, and a robust line of credit, making a bank loan the perfect option. Or you could have a supportive network of financially-secure family and friends willing to back your idea to the hilt. Perhaps a combination of funding options is best, but only you will truly know. The important thing is to go with a funding option with which you are comfortable and confident so that you can focus on turning your business idea into a success.

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